Monrovia and VFW Honor Veterans

Members of the VFW Post 280 will perform official duties on Friday morning. – Photo by Terry Miller
Members of the VFW Post 280 will perform official duties on Friday morning. – Photo by Terry Miller

 

On Nov. 11 The City of Monrovia and V.F.W. are co-sponsoring a Veterans Day ceremony at Library Park at 11 a.m.

Veterans Day, which was known as Armistice Day until 1954, is commonly confused with Memorial Day. The difference? Memorial Day was established to celebrate the lives of veterans who have died while serving the country. Veterans Day is largely intended to thank retired military members who are still living and to acknowledge their contributions to our national security.

The Veterans Day National Ceremony is held each year on Nov. 11 at Arlington National Cemetery. The ceremony commences precisely at 11a.m. with a wreath laying at the Tomb of the Unknowns and continues inside the Memorial Amphitheater with a parade of colors by veterans’ organizations and remarks from dignitaries. The ceremony is intended to honor and thank all who served in the United States Armed Forces.

The United States Congress adopted a resolution on June 4, 1926, requesting that President Calvin Coolidge issue annual proclamations calling for the observance of Nov. 11 with appropriate ceremonies. A Congressional Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U.S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made Nov. 11 in each year a legal holiday: “a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as ‘Armistice Day’.”

In 1945, World War II veteran Raymond Weeks from Birmingham, Alabama, had the idea to expand Armistice Day to celebrate all veterans, not just those who died in World War I. Weeks led a delegation to Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, who supported the idea of National Veterans Day. Weeks led the first national celebration in 1947 in Alabama and annually until his death in 1985. President Reagan honored Weeks at the White House with the Presidential Citizenship Medal in 1982 as the driving force for the national holiday. Elizabeth Dole, who prepared the briefing for President Reagan, determined Weeks as the “Father of Veterans Day.”

U.S. Representative Ed Rees from Emporia, Kansas, presented a bill establishing the holiday through Congress. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, also from Kansas, signed the bill into law on May 26, 1954. It had been eight and a half years since Weeks held his first Armistice Day celebration for all veterans.

Congress amended the bill on June 1, 1954, replacing “Armistice” with “Veterans,” and it has been known as Veterans Day since.

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