‘Pot, Public Safety and Prison’ With Mayor Adams

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-Courtesy photo

 

Proposition 57 featured prominently in the discussion

This past Thursday, Mayor Adams served as a panelist as part of a town-hall style meeting hosted by the Southern California News Group (SCNG). The event, which was titled, “Pot, Public Safety, and Prison: How California’s Ballot Propositions Impact Our Community,” featured a discussion on Proposition 64, which aims to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in California, and also Proposition 57, which if approved would allow for the early parole / release of those in prison.

In particular, the discussion at the town hall meeting featured impassioned dialogue regarding Proposition 57, a measure which the City of Monrovia has officially opposed. Proposition 57 attempts to reform the prison sentencing system by proposing to allow the early release of “non-violent” felons that meet certain eligibility requirements. As the measure is being considered by voters, it is important to note what actually constitutes a “non-violent” crime under the California Penal Code. The following is a partial list of the most egregious violations that are classified as “non-violent” here in California:

-Rape by intoxication

-Rape of an unconscious person

-Human trafficking involving sex act with minors

-Drive-by shooting

-Assault with a deadly weapon

-Hate crime causing physical injury

-Corporal injury to a child

If Proposition 57 is approved, criminals who are convicted of “non-violent” felonies – including those outlined above – would be eligible for early release from prison. Furthermore, should Proposition 57 be approved, prison sentencing enhancements and consecutive / alternative prison sentences for those convicted of a non-violent felony would be disallowed, which means that those convicted of such crimes would receive lighter prison sentences.

As has been noted by California State Attorney General Kamala Harris, California is experiencing a resurgence increase in crime rates. When comparing calendar year 2014 with calendar year 2015, California as a whole has been confronted with the following disturbing statistics:

-Violent Crime increased by 10 percent

-From 151,425 violent crimes in 2014, to 166,588 violent crimes in 2015

-Property Crime increased by 8.1 percent

-From 946,682 property crimes in 2014, to 1,023,828 property crimes in 2015

-The homicide rate in California increased in 2015 to 4.8 homicides per 100,000 people

-The motor vehicle theft rate increased by 10.9 percent in 2015

In addition, this past week, the California Police Chief’s Association issued a press release reiterating the organization’s strong opposition to Proposition 57. A copy of that notice has been included as an attachment for your review and reference.

 

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