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Mental Health Advice With Stan: How Parents Can Help Their Children Deal With Today’s Mental Health Issues

Teenage angst can be indicative of mental health issues. – Courtesy photo

By Stan Popovich

Do you worry about how your son or daughter can handle today’s mental health issues such as bullying, peer pressure, depression, and addiction?

Here are six suggestions a parent should follow in helping their children overcome the pressures of being a teenager in today’s stressful environment.

1. Talk to Your Teenager on a Regular Basis

One of the most important things a parent can do is to talk to their children about the current issues that they may be dealing with. Do not bombard your son or daughter with endless questions and do not get argumentative. Establish some kind of dialogue between you and your children so they will be willing to talk with you.

2. Education Is Key

Both parents should be familiar on the issues of bullying, suicide, addiction, and other mental health issues. Every teenager should be aware of the resources that are out there to help them and they should be aware of where to go for help.

3. Watch Out For Any Red Flags and Do Not Assume Anything

If you notice any changes in your teenager’s moods or behavior, do something about it by discussing these changes with your son or daughter. If things get serious, then talk to a counselor for some advice. Do not assume that your teenager is going through some kind of phase or they will snap out of it.

4. How to Encourage Your Children to Talk to You

Many teenagers are reluctant to talk to their parents because they are afraid their parents will get angry and take it out on them. Some teenagers may think their parents won’t be able to understand their situation. With this in mind, try to establish a sense of trust with your teenager and encourage them to come to you when they are struggling.

5. Get Advice From Other Parents

If you have trouble getting your teenager to open up to you, try talking to other parents to see how they talk to their sons and daughters. You may get some helpful insights on how you can successfully engage your children.

6. See Things From Your Children’s Perspective:

Many parents engage their children from their own point of view. Another helpful suggestion is to try to see things from your teenager’s perspective when dealing with their problems. Once you see things from your teenager’s point of view, you will be better able to get your teenager to open up to you.

Stan Popovich is a Penn State graduate and the nationally known anxiety  author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear”— an easy-to-read  overcoming anxiety book that’s helped thousands of people to confidently  manage their persistent fears and anxieties. Stan has over 20 years of personal experience in dealing with fear and anxiety. For more free mental health advice visit Stan’s website at managingfear.com and read Stan’s articles and his blog. The above is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Mr. Popovich is not a medical professional. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

August 8, 2019

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Stan Popovich


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